In-depth PokeDex Project

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(First post, so if this is in an inappropriate place please move).

Hi! I'm looking for some people to help me with a passion project of mine.

See, I wondered a while ago what an in-world PokeDex would look like - instead of a brief description of the Pokemon itself as well as some interesting trivia, what would a Trainer, Breeder or caretaker need to know in order to take care of any given Pokemon? So, that in mind, I began crafting this, with the help of a few friends.

(I'm also a programmer and 3D printing enthusiast, among other things, so this might make it into a physical PokeDex depending on how far it gets.)

Anyway, the Discord server for the project is here (though you don't have to join it to submit entries!) Duplicate entries are also alright, because I'm interested to see what different ideas people might have for the same Pokemon species.

General format for entries goes something like this:

NUMBER - NAME
[Class] Pokemon
[Type 1]/[Type 2]

Average Height: (these are taken from Bulbapedia)
Average Weight:

Description: The official Pokedex entries across games for this Pokemon go here, summed into a paragraph or two. Words can be changed a little for the sake of readability.

[Specimen Log] (this doesn't have any purpose yet, but if I ever make this into an official PokeDex it'll have a few fun features)

Caretaking Advice: (this is the part you write! Be sure to include things like health complications, living conditions (cold, hot, wet, dry, indoors, outdoors, rocky, grassy, etc.) and anything else you think would fit! Easy inspiration comes from basing Pokemon off their real-world animal counterparts - for example, the Mudkip family are derived from Axolotls and could probably share similar diet, lifestyle and habitat.)

(diet typically goes at the end of Caretaking Advice, as a separate paragraph)

Egg Group: (also taken from Bulbapedia)

Example:

"133 – EEVEE
Evolution Pokemon
Normal

Average Height: 0.3 m
Average Weight: 6.5 kg

Description: Eevee’s genetic code is irregular, and it may mutate if exposed to radiation from certain stones or areas to suit its environment. Its ability to evolve into many different forms allows it to adapt smoothly and perfectly to any new or harsh environment. Eevee’s unstable genetics are unique to the species, and are a key mystery to the process of evolution.

[Specimen Log]

Caretaking Advice: Eevee is one of the easiest Pokemon to care for, due to its high adaptability to its surroundings and friendly nature. Unfortunately, Eevee’s genetic complications render it very susceptible to problems later in life, from various cancers to sickle-cell anaemia, as well as a rare chance of total genetic breakdown (complete failure of RNA transcription). However, these issues largely go away once Eevee has adapted fully to its environment and evolved into one of its more stable, Type-oriented forms. As an Eevee caretaker, therefore, there should be a high priority for it to evolve as soon as possible, and no later than ten years of age. When young, an Eevee should be allowed to play with other Pokemon as frequently as possible, and preferably with either older, evolved forms of Eevee or a variety of different Pokemon types – this will be important for when it determines what to evolve into when older.

Eevee is omnivorous and shares largely the same palate as a human, with a somewhat lower emphasis on grains such as wheat and bread. Because of this, no special dietary advice is needed, though care should still be taken to avoid excessive fats or sugar consumption.

Egg Group: Field"

Last thing I want to note is the placement of lore within this project. A lot of hidden lore can be found in some entries (from Mewtwo's including the recent events of Detective Pikachu to Mew's referencing the Pokemon Mansion Journals from the Generation I games. Another fun thing you can do is throw in a tidbit of vital caretaking information that's just off-putting enough to make someone wonder why that had to be written down in the first place.

So with all that said, I can't wait to see what ideas people here have! We've already got about 43 entries, but there's still plenty of room!
 
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I joined the project a few days ago, just finished my first entry (on Zubat, what else did you expect from me?) and was asked to bump this thread up a bit.
So... we're still looking for more writers and will happily accept anyone willing to help. Even if you don't feel like actually writing, just throwing around some ideas and advice will be already of help. As an example, my entry on Zubat:

041 - ZUBAT
Bat Pokémon
Poison/Flying
Average Height: 0.8 m
Average Weight: 7.5 kg

Description: Millenia of living mostly inside caves led to these Pokémon adapting perfectly into this sort of environment. Though Zubat lacks senses of smell and vision, it more than makes up for this drawback with very keen hearing, as well as a larynx specifically adapted to emit high frequency sounds (up to 110,000 Hz). Together these two traits create a potent bio sonar, which Zubat can use to create an accurate map of its surroundings up to 5 meters away - or, with decreasing accuracy, up to 65 meters away.

[Specimen Log]

Biology: Its thin skin is both completely bald and lacking any sort of pigment; its characteristic cyan tint comes from blue, copper-based blood flowing just beneath. Rare green coloration, popularly known as “shiny” and highly prized by collectors, may be a symptom of anemia. Zubats are hematophagic parasites, feeding mostly on blood of humans and Pokémon passing through their territory, but otherwise leaving them mostly unharmed. They possess a bioluminescent tongue, used to lure their prey closer; with some practice, it can be used in battle to perform Confuse Ray or even Swift attacks. Females can be distinguished by smaller fangs.

Caretaking Advice: Zubats are intelligent and highly social, living in colonies in the wild and depending on each other to survive. For this reason it’s important for their psychological comfort to raise them alongside a group of other Pokémon. They’re extremely susceptible to sunburns due to lack of pigment or fur. While they do develop some resistance to it after becoming Crobat, up until then care must be taken to protect them from sunlight in any way possible - throughout the house they should have multiple safe, dark places to hide, and during travel they should be kept inside pokeballs or have protective filters applied.

Zubat’s saliva contains anticoagulants, slowing down the healing rate of most bite wounds dealt by this Pokémon. While not life threatening in small quantity, Zubats specifically trained for Pokémon battles will sometimes purposely inject large amounts of it into an opponent’s bloodstream. This may easily prove fatal, especially for smaller Pokémon like Rattata or Pikachu. For this reason it’s important to teach it how to control the amount of poison used in battle in order to avoid lethal accidents.

While wild Zubats are cathemeral, those living in captivity will often adopt nocturnal lifestyle instead, spending most of the day sleeping and leaving their homes at night in search of prey. While not impossible to make a captive Zubat switch back into cathemerality or even diurnality, it does require a degree of sun protection during the daylight hours. In order to stay healthy, Zubat needs both large, open spaces for practicing flying and more crammed ones filled with obstacles to train its echolocation. For this reason they feel comfortable in forests, which provide them with both.

Zubats feed mostly on blood, though their diet also includes some berries. Something to take into consideration when preparing a diet for captive Zubat is the fact that its own blood possesses copper-based hemocyanin in place of iron-based hemoglobin present among most other mammalian Pokémon, leading to it both requiring higher amounts of copper than most Pokémon its size and being more susceptible to iron poisoning. A mixture of cow milk and blood is widely considered a good dietary choice. In order to fulfill its copper requirements, it should also be supplemented with copper-rich berries like Durin or Aguav. Shiitake mushrooms are also a good source of copper.

Egg Group: Flying

It started with me noting that as a troglobites, it would make sense for Zubats to be albinos, and trying to justify why they're cyan then - and then it snowballed into... a quite deep research on the biology of a fictional creature. And now, just as I'm writing this, we're having similar discussion on what's Gastly's body made of. Those discussions are a big part of what I feel makes those entries good, realistic and overall what we want them to be. But we need more people for discussion. So if you feel like your favourite Pokemon deserves a more in-depth Pokedex entry, join us now!
 
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Just hit the 50-entry mark! Still looking for writers, so if you have a favorite Pokemon, please feel free to stop by and submit your ideas for it!

The Discord server is still running, and there's been a lot of fun discussions so far (my personal favorite being the chemical composition of a Gastly. We eventually agreed upon mostly hydrogen, with significant amounts of hydrogen iodide, hydrogen cyanide, and a small amount of departed souls). You can join it here: Join the Project Pokedex Discord Server!

I'm also working on a 3D-printed Arduino-based Pokedex that'll host all these entries and act more or less like a real one! Image recognition software is going to be a pain, but I do have the model just about ready for printing (I went with the Sinnoh 'Dex because it's my personal favorite):

129304
 
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Just hit the 100-entry mark! We've got a couple people on board as of right now, but we could always use more!

We're also doing work on a 'family tree' of Pokemon - since we started adding fancy Latin species names, we figured this would be a good way to keep everything sorted. Of course, even that's no small undertaking - could definitely use some help there!

Last thing I've been personally working on is that Arduino-based IRL Pokedex. Put a lot of work into redesigning the internal geometry to fit everything I need (though it doesn't much show on the outside, thankfully!) Test 3D prints are coming out great:
pokedex.jpg
I've also got a screen working, but I'm still working on modifying it into a touch screen. (Those graphics aren't final, btw - just testing the text drawing function with the D/P/Pt font imported).
pokedexscreen.jpg
 
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I keep bumping this in the hopes that we get some more writers... the people who are here are amazing contributors, but I'm always looking to avoid that echo chamber effect. If anyone even has vague ideas on in-depth caretaking for certain Pokemon, we'll happily take them!

Getting closer on that IRL Pokedex too. No pictures this time, but I've got a functional touchscreen UI and the Diamond/Pearl/Platinum font installed. Debating selling these when I'm done (everyone in the server is probably going to get one anyway).
 
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Here is an entry for Turtonator. It is rather long, to the point where I cut some stuff out and it is still super long (the cut content is available at the bottom; it would have gone at the end of the biology section). If I need to trim anything else out, just let me know.
776 - Turtonator
Blast Turtle Pokémon
Fire/Dragon

Average Height: 2.0m (6'07")
Average Weight: 212.0 kg (467.4 lbs)
Description:
Making its home in volcanoes, Turtonator eats the sulfur and other explosive minerals that are brought to the surface by the molten rock. These materials form the basis of its shell, which is highly explosive in nature and will detonate in a massive explosion if struck. Excess materials that are not absorbed into the shell are expelled in its droppings, which are also very explosive and have a variety of uses as a result. Turtonator's shell is highly susceptible to moisture so it will take refuge in caves on rainy days. The star-shaped hole in its stomach is considered its weak point. It unleashes gas and flames from its single nostril.
[Specimen Log]
Biology:
Turtonator are Fire/Dragon draconian turtles known for their shell's explosive capabilities. Their muted, grey-green-brown skin is smooth and covered in tough, scaleless skin, which is not as hard nor stiff as their red shell. They have a long, spiked neck which is highly flexible as Turtonator face backwards when fighting, craning their necks to look over their back. Their head has a single, long modified nostril which they use to sniff for food as well as unleash special attacks. Turtonator lack teeth, instead, they use their hard “beak” and bony mouth plates to crush rocks and food. Turtonator’s tail is relatively long compared to most other turtle Pokémon and is covered in hard armor made of the same material as their shell. They use their heavy tails as a club, which can be swung with enough force to dent metal, and as a counterweight when moving (relatively) quickly. Their muscular arms and oven-mitt hands are stubby, though the single "thumb" is opposable and can be used to grasp objects, albeit rather clumsily. They are primarily used to sift through rocks for explosive substances as well as push the Pokémon up off its stomach should it lie down. Turtonator's legs are similarly muscular and their feet have claws made of the same material as their shell. When this Pokémon detonates, it will dig its claws into the ground and, using its strong legs to hold itself steady, remain in place instead of being pushed onto its back or stomach by the force of the explosion.

As Turtonator detonate, a rush of hot air and smoke from the explosion is pushed through an empty cavity in the abdomen and is ejected through the hole in the stomach. If the hole is blocked, severe internal damage or even death may occur as the explosion rebounds inside the Pokémon's body. While Turtonator avoid blocking the hole they may occasionally plug it, typically with a rock, in certain situations such as swimming in magma or lava (though Turtonator have been observed swimming without a plug). If significant moisture accumulates on the shell or enters the stomach hole, then the Pokémon will be unable to denote their shell. They use magma, lava, or dust as a substitute for water when bathing. If excess moisture accumulates on the shell or in the hole, the Pokémon may attempt to eliminate the moisture by evaporating it with heat. If Turtonator are unable to properly dry off, they can become very ill, timid, and sluggish.

Turtonator's most defining and studied characteristic is its explosive shell. The outermost part of the front section of the shell is split into five plates, while the back part consists of one plate. While the hard shell is fused together, the internal bony plates are not.

Turtonator slowly develop their shell as they consume reactive and explosive substances such as sulfur and phosphorus found in their volcanic homes. Only the cells of the yellow part of the shell contain explosive materials, which is present in the topmost layers of the shell. Pores in these cells release the materials onto the surface of the shell and coat it in a fine powder, which ignites when struck such as by the Pokémon's tail or an enemy's attack. Turtonator typically have eight spikes on their shell, which are modified scutes. While the cells of these spikes lack explosive materials, the reactive powder still coats the bottoms of them in light layers. It is believed that the primary purpose of these spikes is to prevent the shell from coming into contact with things that will cause it to detonate unintentionally as uncontrolled explosions have a high chance of injuring the Pokémon.

Despite the reactivity of the substances that comprise their shell, these Pokémon are able to live in hot, volcanic environments with very little incidences of accidental detonation. While the spikes prevent explosions from contact, they do not protect the Pokémon from unintentional explosions caused by heat and/or chemically induced reactions. The most common hypotheses are that Turtonator release the explosive powder onto their shells in low amounts unless in certain situations such as battle, and/or that Fire and Dragon energy are typically the only fuel sources that can ignite the shell. This lowers the probability of an accidental detonation from occurring.
Caretaking Advice:
Turtonator tend to be calm and gentle, and rarely get agitated. They typically provide lots of warning if annoyed or scared, such as thumping their tail on the ground, before resorting to more drastic measures such as full fledged attacks. They get along well with most other Pokémon, with the exception of Pokémon that produce water and/or moisture, i.e. most Water types. Despite their gentle and easy going nature, however, it is recommended that only experienced trainers that have a history with Fire and/or Dragon should try to train Turtonator. Specific licensing, various background checks, completed training classes, and adequate fireproofing and fire safety procedures for the building(s) the Pokémon will live in or near, such as a house, are required in order to be able to own a Turtonator due to the dangers these Pokémon pose.

The best environment to raise a Turtonator is outdoors in a dry and rocky environment with places for the Pokémon to hide if there is rain. Artificial shelters for the Pokémon should be properly ventilated as Turtonator emit noxious gases from their nose. It is recommended that Turtonator be given lots of space, or exercise if that is not possible, as wild Turtonator typically travel many kilometers in search of food and explosive materials.

Turtonator, like all Pokémon, can suffer from a variety of health problems. The most common health problem domestic Turtonator suffer from is an insufficient amount of explosive materials in their diet, which can be diagnosed by a dull yellow color of the shell in contrast to the typical bright yellow coloration, frantic digging in the yard, and timid behavior. Treatment is a sharp increase in the uptake of explosive materials. Another common health issue is a buildup of moisture on the shell and/or stomach cavity. Certain drying agents are prescribed as a treatment. The cavity in Turtonator’s stomach is a common entryway for diseases due to its exposure to the outer world. While wild Turtonator clean the cavity via explosions, domestic Turtonator typically detonate less and thus clear the cavity of infectious agents fewer times. Dried mucus present along the rim of the hole is a sign of infection and it is recommended to take the Turtonator to a Pokémon Center for treatment.

Turtonator subside on a steady diet of roasted berries and various prey items, as well as explosive substances such as sulfur. While many Pokémarts offer a wide selection of suitable foods, obtaining the necessary explosive substances is typically much more difficult, usually requiring a permit. The amount of explosive materials fed to trainer-owned Turtonator is typically lower than what wild Turtonator eat, with the exception of more battle-orientated Pokémon. Sulfur is the most common substance fed to Turtonator, and can be obtained from a handful of distributors that sell specialized materials for Pokémon. However, fertilizer with relatively high concentrations of phosphorus or other reactive minerals can serve as a temporary substitute or supplement if needed, though it is discouraged to use exclusively fertilizer. The droppings of Turtonator are highly reactive unless the Pokémon’s diet lacks the necessary explosive materials. They should be properly stored in secure, damp containers kept away from sources of heat and/or flames. While there is a market for the droppings due to their properties, it is generally recommended that they be disposed of immediately unless one has experience with handling explosives.
Egg Groups: Monster and Dragon

---------------------------​

Cut Content (would have gone in the Biology section):
These rare Pokémon may live in both colonies or alone depending on their location. In or near highly active volcanoes, Turtonator may live in colonies numbering between 15-100 individuals. However, in locations with less volcanic activity, and thus fewer sources of food and explosive substances, Turtonator are more solitary and set up territories, chasing away or even attacking other Turtonator to protect valuable resources.

Typically, the habitat of Turtonaor is mountain chains with active volcanoes. Less common habitants include locations with magma near the surface and regions with large amounts of sulfur and other reactive materials and little moisture. In Turtonator’s typical habitat, usually there is a large colony of the Turtonator based in and/or on the volcano(es), while more isolated Turtonator live alone along the rest of the range. As the colony grows, Turtonator may leave and set up territories on adjacent mountains, keeping the colony population relatively stable. Isolated Turtonator will migrate to the volcano during mating season, if in dire need of explosive materials, or if the colony population decreases significantly.

Turtonator typically mate in large groups right before the driest part of the year. The mother lays clutches consisting of one to two eggs, though occasionally clutches of three and four are laid. The eggs are usually laid in a raised mound of dirt lined with insulating materials containing the clutches of several different parents. The Pokémon will bury explosive substances around the mound for the offspring to consume after they hatch as Turtonator are born with very few reactive minerals in their bodies.

Like most Dragon types, Turtonator age slowly and reach sexual maturity later compared to other Pokémon. Sexual maturity is reached at around 30-35 years while the average lifespan is estimated to be between 500-700 years. Usually age is measured by the thickness of the back part of the shell and the growth rings of the spikes. However, as Turtonator reach a point where they no longer grow, these methods become increasingly inaccurate.
 
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...Wow. I think that just smashed the record for most in-depth entry I've ever seen. You really sweat the details!

I think I'll keep the cut biology content in - frankly, it's a section we need more effort put into on several entries (mostly mine), and it really adds to the well-researched feel of the piece.

You should stop by the Discord server sometime - it's clear you know your stuff!
 
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Alrighty, I have another entry, this time for Applin.
840 - Applin
Apple Core Pokémon
Grass/Dragon

Average Height: 0.2m (0’08”)
Average Weight: 0.5 kg (1.1 lbs)

Description: As soon as it’s born, it burrows into an apple that it spends its entire life in. Not only does the apple serve as its food source, but the flavor of the fruit determines its evolution. It hides from its natural enemies, bird Pokémon, by pretending it's just an apple and nothing more.

[Specimen Log]
Biology:
One of the weakest Dragon types, Applin are small green worms that make their homes in hollowed out apples to protect themselves from bird Pokémon. The dark green part of their body is lined with small scales while the upper, light green part is smooth and feels similar to the skin of caterpillar Pokémon. The tip of the tail has two small antennas, which are used to check the Pokémon’s surroundings. Only the tail and eyestalks remain outside of the apple for long periods of time; the head, mouth, nostrils, and stubby legs of the Pokémon are hidden inside the apple and are rarely seen unless during feeding.

Applin egg cases are laid in the soil near wild apple trees during midsummer, and the eggs hatch in late summer to early fall, coinciding with the maturity of the fruit. The newly hatched Apple Core Pokémon will climb up the nearest tree, where they will inspect the apples before making a selection. They typically prefer large apples with a strong sweet or tart flavor, which they determine by smell and taste. Applin begin to burrow into the apple near the base, before eating through the core and stem, forming a small cavity in the center of the apple. This process takes roughly fifteen to thirty minutes. As Applin burrow into their selected apple, they secret several enzymes and proteins that preserve the fruit and change its coloration. Very rarely, a genetic mutation will cause the chemical structure of the secretions to be slightly different from standard Applin and will change the apple to a green color. The tan coloration on the bottom of the apple gives the illusion of fangs and, combined with Applin’s eyestalks, makes the Pokémon appear larger in an attempt to scare off predators that are not thwarted by its apple disguise. Applin typically go through one to four apples in their life cycle, choosing to change their apple if the outer skin has been broken or once rot takes hold of a significant proportion of the fruit.

Despite their Grass/Dragon typing, Applin are not as susceptible to cold temperatures compared to most other Dragon types. Apple trees grow well in cold climates and their fruits rot slower in colder temperatures, so it is believed that Applin evolved a higher tolerance to cold as a result. However, even still, Applin eat large amounts of Yache berries to absorb their cold-resistant nutrients and typically hibernate in the soil near tree roots during the winter-time. They typically dig a modestly sized burrow and line it with hydrophobic silk to prevent moisture and burrowing insects, mites, and worms from entering the den. They then fill the burrow with leaves for insulation and apples and berries as an emergency food store. Applin will secrete a preserving chemical onto their food in order to slow the rate of rot. As they hatch so close to winter, newborn Applin expend larger amounts of energy on eating and gathering food for the upcoming cold season compared to older Applin. Once winter is over, the Pokémon burrow out of the soil and subside on berries. From spring to midsummer, Applin are typically cautious as the apple trees have not yet produced fruit and their apples are close to rotting. If their apple becomes uninhabitable, they will usually be unable to find a new one. Rarely, Applin may turn to other fruit or even berries if apples are not available. Without an apple, these Pokémon are unable to evolve, though there are numerous claims of non-apple evolutions. However, as it stands, there is no conclusive evidence that Applin can evolve without an apple.
Caretaking Advice:
Applin are considered to be one of the best Dragon types for beginners. They lack the size, required space, strength, behavior, dietary needs, and aging typical of many other Dragon types. The fact that their evolution can be induced by feeding the Pokémon either a sweet or tart apple means that the trainer can usually evolve them at any time, in contrast to most other Dragon types that take many years and levels to evolve.

Due to the wide distribution of apple trees, Applin can typically live comfortably in most temperate environments, with the exception of dry regions. Generally speaking, room temperature, or 20–22°C (68–72°F), is a good temperature to raise Applin in. Trainers should keep Applin inside during extreme bouts of hot and cold weather to prevent issues such as accelerated rot and frostbite to both the Pokémon and its apple home (mature apples typically cannot survive below-freezing temperatures) respectively. Modest humidity is generally ideal; if there is not much moisture in the air, it is recommended that the trainer occasionally spray their Applin with water to keep it hydrated. A space for Applin to burrow in such as a pile of plant matter or, if plant matter is unavailable or undesirable to use, then blankets and/or towels should be available inside the dwelling for Applin to burrow and sleep in as wild Applin spend most of their time hidden in underbrush. It is recommended to keep Applin away from sources of large amounts of ethylene gas. Ethylene gas encourages the ripening and rotting of fruit, and can hasten the rotting of Applin’s apple.

Applin owners will typically have to deal with an apple change at least once during their Pokémon’s lifecycle. Signs that it is time for an apple change include the Applin spending less and less time inside the apple, greater affinity for other fruits and berries (this is the Applin searching for a new home), softness of the apple, appearances of blemishes on the apple skin, mold and/or fungi on the apple, and dark lesions on the apple surface. Applin will typically try to stay within their apple for as long as possible before discarding it, however, it is recommended to change apples at the first sign of rot to avoid health issues. To encourage the Applin to reject its apple, peel off parts of the outer layer of the apple’s skin while the Pokémon is asleep (peeling the apple while the Applin is awake will cause it to become stressed and it may end up attacking) and present the Pokémon with the replacement apple when it awakes. It will then leave its original apple and begin to bore into the replacement. While store-bought apples meant for human consumption can work as a replacement, it is best if specially cultivated apples meant specifically for Applin are used. These apples are generally larger than standard apples, and are bred specifically to encourage healthy Applin evolution as the sweet or tart flavor is much stronger in comparison.

Applin are susceptible to a variety of diseases and health issues as a result of living inside an apple. Some species of fungi that infect apples can also infect Applin as well, and molds that grow on apples produce spores that can cause respiratory issues. When Applin are ill, they tend to remain in their apples and may plug one or both of the two openings in the apple. While this may protect them from predators and other diseases as they recover from their illness in the wild, it can exacerbate health issues in captive Applin as it may seal the Applin in with disease-causing agents. If the Applin shows signs of illness, it is advised to peel off large segments of the apple’s skin and remove the plug(s) to encourage the Pokémon to reject the apple. Do not present the Pokémon with a replacement apple or fruit as untreated Applin can transmit diseases to the replacement. Instead, bring the Applin to a Pokémon Center, an inorganic substitute apple will be provided for the Pokémon to recover in along with medicine.

Applin are herbivorous and typically eat apples, apple leaves, berries, and other fruits. Generally, Applin prefer apples with a strong sweet or tart flavor as well as berries with a sweet or sour, i.e. tart, flavor such as Payapa, Roseli, Custap, Rowap, Colbur, and Salac berries because they encourage its evolution. For trainers who desire a specific evolution, it is recommended to feed the Applin fruits and berries that align with the desired evolution: sweet foods for Appletun and sour/tart foods for Flapple.

Egg Group: Grass and Dragon
 
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NUMBER - Houndoom
The Dark Pokemon
Fire/Dark

Average Height: 1.4 Meters in Base form, 1.9 meters in Mega Form
Average Weight: 35.0 kg in Base form, 49.5 kg

Description: Houndoom's flame's are said to cause eternal pain if felt by human skin. The flames have toxins, which is what causes this pain. Its howls are enough to strike fear into people and pokemon alike, being regarded at the "Call of the Grim Reaper." The Houndoom's choose a leader by fighting, with the one with its horns raked sharply toward the back serving the role of leader. Upon Mega Evolution, the red claws and tip of its tail are melting due to the painful high internal temperatures.

[Specimen Log] (this doesn't have any purpose yet, but if I ever make this into an official PokeDex it'll have a few fun features)

Caretaking Advice: These pokemon are normally found inside of packs. If you are caring for one, keep it in a large, closed environment. Hounds have an excellent sense of smell, so allow it to chase smells around inside a closed area. Or else they'll escape while chasing a smell. Don't be afraid to keep them around children, as they are very loyal, and tolerant of children. Make sure these pokemon socialize at an early age, so they can get used to being around children and the elderly.

Feed this pokemon food that is high in protein, like Lean Meat. Cooked and certain raw vegetables can be added for extra vitamins and nutrients. Try feeding them 2-4 small meals a day to prevent Bloating. As a puppy or a Houndour, don't be afraid to give them one large meal a day.



Egg Group: Field

((I tried aaa
 
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