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Japan Holidays

Official Link Fanglomper
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It’s been a while since I’ve actively been around and a lot of stuff has happened since then offline which included a nearly 7 week hospital stay and some work-related issues, and I’m sorry for that. That aside, I decided to start a thread about Japanese holidays. I’m a bit late for January, though, but I’ll mention it anyway along with February.

Also, adding on, there's at least one national holiday every single month except for August, but this is recently being changed. They just recently came up with Yama no Hi. Mountain Day. The reason it's set up this way, is so that workers can have at least one day off for those too stubborn to take their vacation time or those who are so dedicated to work can take a break.

January
01 – Like most places around the world, everyone celebrates this holiday in some way or form. In Japan, it’s a very important holiday. If I were to describe it, I’d say it’s equivalent to our Christmas. Most everything is closed, including businesses, whereas for Christmas in Japan, it’s not so much a big deal. In Japan, for New Year’s, many people return to their hometowns to spend it with family. They may have such treats, like mocchi and a special new year’s meal called “o-sechi (御節料理)”. It’s like a bento box filled with many different foods representing things like prosperity, good fortune, and wealth for the year to come.
Oseti.jpg

Another tradition is partaking in “otoshidama” (御年玉) which means new year money. For New Year’s, children receive money from parents, grandparents, etc., for the holiday.

Let’s see, another tradition for New Year’s consists of sending out cards. New Year’s cards.
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19 – This year, it was on the 19th. It’s called “seijin no hi” (成人の日). It occurs every year on the second Monday in January. This day is to celebrate Japanese people turning 20. There’s a special ceremony where many attend, dressed in formal kimonos. The young adults attend the prefectural office or someplace where government officials give speeches. Twenty, is the legal age to do most things in Japan.

February
11 – Kenkoku Kinen no Hi (建国記念の日) or National Foundation Day. This holiday is the celebration of the foundation of Japan. Many people don’t do much for this day, but traditionally, people usually raise Japanese flags to show patriotism...but yeah, not much is actively done.
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14 – Valentine’s Day is interesting. It’s celebrated in an interesting way. Boys receive gifts from girls on this day. Chocolates. Sometimes mothers might prepare chocolates for their sons, you know, so they can get something. lol That aside there are three types of chocolates that can be given on this holiday…

Giri Choco: This means “obligation chocolates”. This is the type of chocolate that one gives out of obligation or feels she should, like maybe a woman giving chocolate to a coworker.

Tomo Choco: This chocolate is given to one’s friend. “Tomo” is short for “Tomodachi” which means “friend” in Japanese. A more modern thing some women/girls do, they give chocolates to their female friends as well.

Honmei Choco: Honmei is short for “homemade”, so I've heard, but it truly means "true feeling" chocolate. In Japan, homemade foods given as a gift means a lot. For example, Sora in Digimon Adventure 02 prepared cookies for Yamato (Matt) as a present. This was her way of showing she liked him as more than a friend. Girls/women may give this to guys they have a romantic interest in or a girlfriend/wife to her boyfriend/husband.

To add on, during this time, the stores sell chocolate-making kits...which usually associated with Honmei choco. Store-bought chocolate is generally used for girl and tomo choco.
 
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ケロケロ
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Honmei Choco: Honmei is short for “homemade”. In Japan, homemade foods given as a gift means a lot. For example, Sora in Digimon Adventure 02 prepared cookies for Yamato (Matt) as a present. This was her way of showing she liked him as more than a friend. Girls/women may give this to guys they have a romantic interest in or a girlfriend/wife to her boyfriend/husband.[/SIZE][/FONT]
I think that honmei here actually comes from 本命/ほんめい, meaning something like "favorite" or "true feelings."
 
Official Link Fanglomper
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Honmei Choco: Honmei is short for “homemade”. In Japan, homemade foods given as a gift means a lot. For example, Sora in Digimon Adventure 02 prepared cookies for Yamato (Matt) as a present. This was her way of showing she liked him as more than a friend. Girls/women may give this to guys they have a romantic interest in or a girlfriend/wife to her boyfriend/husband.[/SIZE][/FONT]
I think that honmei here actually comes from 本命/ほんめい, meaning something like "favorite" or "true feelings."
You're right, although I've heard folks say homemade as well here. *adds info*
 
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