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Science and Pokémon: Pokémon eggs: Analyzing the concepts behind the game

Dreams of electric Bulbasaur
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Science and Pokémon: Pokémon eggs: Analyzing the concepts behind the game

Just like with the Pokémon themselves, the science that surrounds them is often based on the real world. The translation of the real world science to the world of Pokémon is dubious at times, but it is rooted in science.

Read more on Bulbanews
 
Game on.
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That was a nice read, interesting really, but does put a few questions in your head: What about Tauros and Miltank?
 
«The Ashen Knight»
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Nice. This never get's old:

Pokemon Day-Care on Bulbapedia said:



Inside the Day Care on Route 34​
I wonder when you guys are going to change that. :p

Still of course eggs are true to RL. ;)
 
Registered User
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That was really interesting. I enjoyed it alot. Ive always thought wit the ditto thing that Ditto simply transforms into the other pokemon to breed, which isnt a complicated concept. As for other Pokemon i just dont know. Its not completely based on science, it cant be.
 
The Possibly Fake
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I didn't learn anything new from that. It didn't delve as deep as some writers (like that of Origin of Species) goes into; you could sum it all up in a sentence:
"Mammals usually don't lay eggs, but echidnas and platypuses do, so it's cool for Pokémon too - and Ditto's weird."

Also, Magnemite can breed; it's in the Mineral egg group, meaning that if you breed a Magnemite/ton/zone with a Ditto, you can get Magnemite eggs. So the point about that is void. Also:
And again, to not allow the legendary Pokémon to reproduce is another time that Pokémon follows the rules of science: when there is only one animal left in a species, it cannot reproduce
It has never been said that there are only one of the species; the most likely reason that legendaries aren't allowed to be bred, is that they are supposed to be special and hard to obtain. Besides, with seem a Lugia and its child in the anime.
 
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I've got to say I agree with Joshawott in that it wasn't really informative. Still a nice piece, but it barely touched on the biological implications of breeding in Pokemon; I already knew everything in the article. Maybe that's because there's not enough source material to write about.
 
Pokémon Master
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Nice article! So who came first: Pokémon or the eggs? And about legendaries, of course they can't breed, there's way too many legendary Pokémon already, we don't need any more of them.
 
total eclipse of the heart
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I'd love to be able to breed legendaries. We can never have enough. D:

And an interesting read, even if we didn't learn anything new. Well wait, I did. D8 I didn't know echidnas lay eggs too.
 
What would happen?
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I'm twelve years old and what is this?







.. But seriously, very interesting read. I like that Pokemon derives a lot from actual science. Also, now I know where Wailskitties come from and why :).
 
the future is not written
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That was a nice read, interesting really, but does put a few questions in your head: What about Tauros and Miltank?
I have always wondered why Tauros and miltank have never had a joint baby form; they're based on the same species.

I've got to say I agree with Joshawott in that it wasn't really informative. Still a nice piece, but it barely touched on the biological implications of breeding in Pokemon; I already knew everything in the article. Maybe that's because there's not enough source material to write about.
Ya, it wasn't very deep science-wise -- I was trying to make it an interesting read and go for breadth at the same time.
 
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I thought that this was a really nice article. It was an easy read and I thought the concepts and ideas were explained nicely. The most interesting part of the article for me was about the platypus and echidna.
 
Child of the Atom
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I thought that this was a really nice article. It was an easy read and I thought the concepts and ideas were explained nicely. The most interesting part of the article for me was about the platypus and echidna.
Those are my thoughts exactly. :D

I liked it.
 
Aura is with me
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Most people have a Ditto parked in the Day Care as it can breed with any other Pokémon.
you make it sound like ditto is a car!! LOL

it would be bizarre to see a Magnemite lay an egg,
baby magnets LOL

(all was quoted from the article)
 
Elite Bulbapedian
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When I was reading about platypuses and echidnas, I kept anticipating the use of the word monotreme, and was disappointed that it was never used.
 
A magical girl, transforming very slowly
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I thought this was a neat article. As a biology nerd, I've often pondered the mechanics of Pokémon breeding.

Since different kinds of Pokémon can breed with each other, and the rough definition of a species is a population that can interbreed, we can consider all breeding Pokémon to be members of a single, super-diverse species. This isn't unprecendented in nature. The best example is dogs. All domestic dogs, no matter what the breed, are part of the same species, Canis lupus. In fact, they make up a subspecies, Canis lupus familiaris. Dogs can look very different, but all breeds are capable of interbreeding... at least genetically, though there may be practical barriers.

And I consider these practical barriers to be the primary reason for "egg groups". We can't class egg groups as separate species because there are Pokémon that can be in more than one egg group at the same time. Instead, let's think of egg groups as a group of Pokémon with shared physical characteristics that make interbreeding easy. A Pokémon from a different egg group may find it physically difficult - impossible, even - to mate with them. A Chihuahua and a Great Dane are genetically compatible, but their great difference in size would make the chances of them mating very slim. I think that similar physical barriers are what keep Pokémon in different egg groups from interbreeding (though evidently size isn't one of them, as we know from Skitty and her beloved Wailord).

What about Pokémon in two egg groups? Well, just as a dog intermediate in size between a Chihuahua and Great Dane could breed with both, Pokémon in two egg groups probably represent intermediate states between the two groups.

There's also the factor of behavioural differences. Dogs can breed with wolves, for example, but they almost never do because their habits are different, and essentially they just aren't attracted to each other. This may also be a big factor in egg groups, if we're to believe the Day Care Man. Pokémon that are incompatible are described as showing no interest in each other, which is consistent with this theory.

Finally, as for Pokémon in the "no eggs" group, I've always maintained that they probably can breed, just not in captivity. While there's a handful of legendaries, such as Mewtwo, that might truly be considered one-offs, Most "no eggs" Pokémon must have some way of reproducing. Unown is an example - there's bloody millions of them. And it seems downright illogical that Nidorina and Nidoqueen should be unable to breed... far better to assume that the conditions in the daycare just aren't right for them to do it.
 
the future is not written
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When I was reading about platypuses and echidnas, I kept anticipating the use of the word monotreme, and was disappointed that it was never used.
Haha I almost did and then decided not to XD

Bikini Miltank said:
long post
All of that makes sense.
(was that an impromptu article? XD)
 
Calvin Klein?
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I've got something bothering me. It says that crossbreeds can't breed. We know why, but why forget camas or the polar-brown bear? They can breed.
Nerdiness aside, great article. Hope to see more like this if not better.
 
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