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The Japanese Language Help Thread

SSJ_Jup81

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”ちゃん”はやめてくれ。キモい。

By the way, if you were trying to write in Japanese, then write in Japanese kana and kaji, not the romanji in Roman alphabet. If you are using Windows Vista or any other later version, then you can choose to have Japanese keyboard input under the Region and Language in the Control Panel, even your Windows is English in default. Yes. Asian language inputs are already included in all Windows OS posterior Vista.
Simply because, Japanese people do not write their language in Roman alphabets.

And just another question from me. Do you know what is the meaning of the suffix "ちゃん" (-chan) that is placed at the end of people's name?
Kurisutaru-chan,

Sometimes, this site does have a problem with Japanese characters. When I tried to reply to you, my post disappeared and I saw that you were a native speaker so I put it in romanji so that the post doesn't disappear. I do have a Japanese keyboard and do know how to use the kana.

And as for "-chan", i learned that its used for females and little kids. And you were a girl so... lol

(yeah most of the native speakers I talk to all call me -chan, because I am a girl, so I picked up on that)
Well, chan can be used with guys too. I use it with a friend of mine. His whole family does, but he doesn't seem to care for guys calling him this, but doesn't have a prob with girls calling him that. It just depends on the nature of the relationship, really. Male friends can even use it with each other. I heard it when working at a Japanese JHS, so yeah. lol

But as it was probably pointed out, you should always refer to people using "san" unless you get close enough to said person where you can use something more friendly, like no honorific at all. Like the example above. Sometimes I use "chan" sometimes I don't use it at all. With others, I don't call them by their family names anymore and maybe go by their given names + san. I only do so out of habit, mostly, though, especially if the person is older than I am. It's also kind of instinctive to use an honorific if said person uses one with you, unless you tell said person not to, like I have.

"Okay, we hang together as friends. Drop the -san!"
"Oh, okay, Wendy."
"That's more like it....but you can call me Wendy-chan."
"......."
"Joking!" lol

The only time said person would use "san" with me, is if he's talking about me to someone else. He'd use "san" out of politeness and I notice many people do that. If he/she is talking about a person, they'll use "san".
お前らさん、質問をしたい。

What is the best way to learn all the Kanji? Not just what they are in English.
IMO, the best way to learn them is to write them and to use flashcards. I know one person who remembers her kanji by breaking down the character into parts to help her remember the meaning. For example, the kanji for car is 車. I remember it because it looks like a cart/buggy to me, like a vehicle. It helps to transport things from one place to another. Of course it's an old character, but has the same function. Maybe the general population don't go driving buggies, but they drive cars, so yeah. I know, weird.
 
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みさあき

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Well, chan can be used with guys too. I use it with a friend of mine. His whole family does, but he doesn't seem to care for guys calling him this, but doesn't have a prob with girls calling him that. It just depends on the nature of the relationship, really. Male friends can even use it with each other. I heard it when working at a Japanese JHS, so yeah. lol

But as it was probably pointed out, you should always refer to people using "san" unless you get close enough to said person where you can use something more friendly, like no honorific at all. Like the example above. Sometimes I use "chan" sometimes I don't use it at all. With others, I don't call them by their family names anymore and maybe go by their given names + san. I only do so out of habit, mostly, though, especially if the person is older than I am.
Ah. With me, it's more so being friendly with the other person. Like I have no preference for what anyone calls me [Ami-chan, Ami-san, Ami-kun; though I do like Ami-chan better] and alot of people I talk to call me -chan. So that's why I also do the same.
 

CrystaI

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ああ、あなたは中国人です。そうですか。
たぶん私は、私は文字を降りることができるように広東語を学習することを考えていた。
Unfortunately I'm "technically" not Chinese, and I don't possess a China passport nor ID, also I didn't born in China either.

All I can just say is that, I'm born in a country where its was originally not part of China, and its current political situation is very difficult against the current China government.

Ah, and also, I speak Cantonese as well, so you can ask me for language help in that as well.
 

Satoshi_Pikachu

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Uh, this is a question about reading kanji. I've noticed that the on-readings can sometimes change to a consonant from the same family (I mean as in k, g or h/f, b, p). For example, 間, which has on-readings of kan and ken, is read as gen when used in certain words, such as 人間. However, in 時間, it's read as kan. Or 日々, which is read as hibi. Why? Is there a way to know which reading to use?
 

Tsurugi

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Uh, this is a question about reading kanji. I've noticed that the on-readings can sometimes change to a consonant from the same family (I mean as in k, g or h/f, b, p). For example, 間, which has on-readings of kan and ken, is read as gen when used in certain words, such as 人間. However, in 時間, it's read as kan. Or 日々, which is read as hibi. Why? Is there a way to know which reading to use?
Apparently that's due to something called "rendaku". Wikipedia could probably explain it way better than I can, but from what I gather, the first consonant of the second kanji in a compound word gets an accent added to it.

I assume that 時間 doesn't follow this because the 間 is just considered a suffix to the 時 and not a unique compound word.
 

みさあき

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I don't want to bother people, but can someone... help me translate this reply to one of my comments?

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僕は”ちゃん”と呼ばれるべき年齢では無いですが、親しみを持ってくれてるのは嬉しく思います
I think it says "'chan' is not the word to use for my age, but i am flattered" but I want to make sure so I don't look dumb :eek:
 

Tsurugi

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僕は”ちゃん”と呼ばれるべき年齢では無いですが、親しみを持ってくれてるのは嬉しく思います
I think it says "'chan' is not the word to use for my age, but i am flattered" but I want to make sure so I don't look dumb :eek:
"I'm not at an age that should be called "chan", but it makes me happy to be given such familiarity"

Your translation is also acceptable, but omits a lot of the second half of the sentence. (Though my translation probably slightly stilted, so take it with a grain of salt.)
 

みさあき

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i am guessing the person doesn't mind :eek:

arigato tsurugi-san
 
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White Phoenix

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This is an unusual language problem to find a solution for since it is not actually a grammar or translation problem.

So. I could probably guess, but that really doesn’t help me learn the correct usage now does it?

In English, when we make an inventory of objects we follow the pattern:

apple, Granny Smith
apple, McIntosh
apple, Red Delicious
pear, Anjou
pear, Bartlett
squash, acorn
squash, butternut
squash, Hubbard

When making such a list in Japanese using kanji or one of the kana, how is it done?
 

make_it_worse

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Do i have to use memorization method to learn all kanji, or is there another way to learn it?
 

SSJ_Jup81

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Do i have to use memorization method to learn all kanji, or is there another way to learn it?
Memorization is probably the best way or constantly writing them until it's burned into memory or using flashcards.
 

kevkim

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Do i have to use memorization method to learn all kanji, or is there another way to learn it?
i know japanese kids memorize their kanji in school. they have this system like for 1st grade, they have to memorize a particular set of kanji, and another new set by 2nd grade and so on. so yeah, memorization is one of the better ways to do it.
 

Kynn Master

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Do i have to use memorization method to learn all kanji, or is there another way to learn it?
In Japan there is something called jouyou kanji and they are separated by levels, the kids start to learn in elementary school and they make some exercises to memorize the stroke order. If I remember there are 10 sets, the last is just studied when they are in middle school I think and is the hardest with kanjis containing 15+ strokes.

I've learned the first level (80 kanjis) and I'm going to learn the second level ones (160). It seems hard but it actually isn't, if you write down them by stroke order you're going to memorize them quickly. :)
 

Satoshi_Pikachu

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Do i have to use memorization method to learn all kanji, or is there another way to learn it?
I know this was posted a while ago, but I'll reply anyway. There's a book called Remembering the Kanji that gives you ways of learning the meanings of all kanji really easily. I was able to learn dozens of meanings per day, and after you know the meanings, it's easy to learn the readings as you encounter them in Japanese text. I didn't actually finish using it because I was too busy, but it's a really good method.
 

make_it_worse

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Do i have to memoriZe all on and kun readings to memorize all kanjis?
If not, which readings do i have to memorize?
 

Satoshi_Pikachu

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Do i have to memoriZe all on and kun readings to memorize all kanjis?
If not, which readings do i have to memorize?
Well, to be honest I learn readings as I encounter them. I used to learn all the readings, but I forgot them after a while because I never used them. You'll learn the different readings as you encounter words that use them.
 

make_it_worse

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I recently saw an episode of Mikakunin de Shinkoukei, where the girl buys a couple of bowls for their "new" relatives in their house... i wonder if every people in a normal japanese house have their own bowl,? She bought a couple of them because they were using the bowls for guests...
 

Saturnidae

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Would someone please explain to me the difference between "Zo" And "Ze?"
I thnk they are both masculine, exuberant forms of "yo" But I really don't know the difference or when one or another is used -_-"
 

Serpentsounds

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Would someone please explain to me the difference between "Zo" And "Ze?"
I thnk they are both masculine, exuberant forms of "yo" But I really don't know the difference or when one or another is used -_-"
Well, this is just from what I understand:

You're right that they're both very masculine, and both similar to "yo", but a bit more extreme, to make the sentence sound forceful. They're both probably a lot more common in anime than in real life conversations. They're both pretty impolite particles, so the usage is very informal.

I think "zo" sounds a bit more...authoritative, so to speak, so you might see it used towards inferiors more often, whereas "ze" might be more common between close friends (and as such would normally sound a little more friendly than "zo").
 
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