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What are some facts about animals that took you by surprise?

chocovelvetcake

Your local cake lover ~ ♡
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Are there any animal facts that made you go "what? no way!" I'll go first:

- Turtles can actually feel what's on their shells. I used to believe that turtles couldn't feel anything on their shells, and that their shells were pretty much like shields that they can just take off and put back on. I remember watching graphic video on youtube where there was a turtle with a severely damaged shell (you could even see it's insides), and this nurse was explaining what happened to it.

- Most mammals have what's called covert menstruation, which means the uterine lining is simply reabsorbed back in to the body if no fertilization takes place as opposed to having your uterine lining shed and bleed out, otherwise known as overt menstruation. In fact, humans are one of the few mammals that go through the latter.

- Out of all the species on earth, mayflies have the shortest lifespan out of everyone, with just about a day. I know there's some animals with short lifespans, but I didn't think there were animals with lifespans that short! Can you imagine living your whole life as a mayfly?

- Whenever bats hang upside down, they don't seem to get dizzy from hanging upside down for a long period of time like humans. This is because their one-way valves prevent blood from flowing backwards. Compared to humans, bars are relatively small enough for gravity to not affect how their blood flows through their bodies.
 
Dogs and cats being able to sense if you have body problems like seizures or your blood pressure. It's crazy how a high sense of smell leads to things we wouldn't even think of before it happens
 
I got one for all of ya: we humans are distant cousins of these guys.

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They're called Tarsiers, and they actually happen to be a member of a sister group of primates to monkeys and apes (including us.)


(And no, they're not lemurs.)
 
I remember being shocked when I first found out the inside of a leatherback sea turtle's mouth......looks like this. :oops:
1698512898465.png


But worry not! Those terrifying-looking spikes are not harmful to anyone-except the turtle's food, that is. They're like a reverse filter- leatherback's swallow a lot of saltwater when they eat, and to get rid of it they vomit it back out. The spikes are to stop the food from being flushed out along with the seawater. Pretty cool, huh?
 
one time my bio teacher told us that the average American eats one credit card worth of microplastics per year

I had no idea humans could ingest that much plastic
 
Hydra is a genus of small freshwater organisms that are known for both their regenerative properties (if you were to cut one in half, the 'head' would regrow a new 'foot' and the 'foot' would regrow a new 'head'. It's even been demonstrated that, in some cases, if you were to blend a hydra into a soup of individual cells and then ball these cells up - they'd form a new hydra) and for seemingly being biologically immortal - as they appear to neither die of old age or even age at all.

The only threats that Hydra appear to face outside of laboratories are predators, weather, and disease.
 
Due to their lower body heat than most mammals, Opossums are extremely resistant to rabies and rarely contract it.

They're also resistant to a fair amount of different snake venoms, and researchers are studying them in the potential of making an antivenom that could be used to help curb snake bite effects in humans.
 
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