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Writers' Workshop General Chat Thread

Son of Ares(?)
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Like I said, I was just guessing. The aesthetic is very "underwater cave" after all.
 
The Mega Multishipper of Miroir Way
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How much detail is too much for a scene?
Honestly, this is a pretty tough question to answer, because some authors write paragraphs upon paragraphs of absolutely gorgeous descriptions, while others can convey the same scene with the same mood in just a few sentences. At the same time, we have tropes like Purple Prose (Purple Prose - TV Tropes) and its opposite Beige Prose (Beige Prose - TV Tropes). What one may find too much/too little, another may find just right.

I'll try my best to answer this question based on what I've read and the way I write:

-First of all, you don't need to describe EVERYTHING. It's better to leave some things to the reader's imagination than have excessive amounts of description that makes your eyes glaze over. At the same time, the reader needs something to springboard off of, so don't be too vague with details.

-Details should provide two functions: helping the reader visualize the scene in their head, and conveying a mood. It's one thing to describe the colors of the walls of a room or the design of the furniture, but it's one thing to use those details to evoke a mood (Are the walls of the daycare a bright pink as joyful and innocent as the children who play there? Is the office of the intimidating boss lit only by the light creeping through the blinds? Is the September morning air filled with the melodies of soft rainfall and birdsong? You get the idea.)

-You don't need to describe everything at once. Think of it like a movie: establishing shots to give a look overview of the area, more details are given as the characters walk through and interact with the scene, maybe describing a few background objects in action when they're essential to the action.

Hope this helps :bulbaWave:
 
Assassin Ninja Frog
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Honestly, this is a pretty tough question to answer, because some authors write paragraphs upon paragraphs of absolutely gorgeous descriptions, while others can convey the same scene with the same mood in just a few sentences. At the same time, we have tropes like Purple Prose (Purple Prose - TV Tropes) and its opposite Beige Prose (Beige Prose - TV Tropes). What one may find too much/too little, another may find just right.

I'll try my best to answer this question based on what I've read and the way I write:

-First of all, you don't need to describe EVERYTHING. It's better to leave some things to the reader's imagination than have excessive amounts of description that makes your eyes glaze over. At the same time, the reader needs something to springboard off of, so don't be too vague with details.

-Details should provide two functions: helping the reader visualize the scene in their head, and conveying a mood. It's one thing to describe the colors of the walls of a room or the design of the furniture, but it's one thing to use those details to evoke a mood (Are the walls of the daycare a bright pink as joyful and innocent as the children who play there? Is the office of the intimidating boss lit only by the light creeping through the blinds? Is the September morning air filled with the melodies of soft rainfall and birdsong? You get the idea.)

-You don't need to describe everything at once. Think of it like a movie: establishing shots to give a look overview of the area, more details are given as the characters walk through and interact with the scene, maybe describing a few background objects in action when they're essential to the action.

Hope this helps :bulbaWave:
Thanks. It makes sense to give details as the character comes to it. Like, I am doing a Breath of the Wild fanfic. I did not mention the Sheikah Slate until Link comes into contact with it.
 
The Mega Multishipper of Miroir Way
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Thanks. It makes sense to give details as the character comes to it. Like, I am doing a Breath of the Wild fanfic. I did not mention the Sheikah Slate until Link comes into contact with it.
That sounds really cool!
Another thing to keep in mind is the point of view, especially if it's in the first person or third person limited. One character may see the bright lights of a city as too garish, while another might think it's beautiful. In this case, how and what the character sees their surroundings can say something about their personality.
 
Kanan Jarrus is a Great Space Dad
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I need to get back to working on In Desperation. It is in first person and not a Pokémon story.
 
Son of Ares(?)
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Is this the right thread to promote my fanfic?
Nope. Here:
 
Assassin Ninja Frog
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Two Questions:
What is a good point to end a chapter?
How many major events should a Chapter have?
 
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Assassin Ninja Frog
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1. It varies. Personally, I like to determine the endpoint before I start writing a chapter. It makes getting there much easier.
2. As many as you need.
Now that you mention that, it makes sense to have an end point planned out before writing.
Thanks.
As for important events, it also makes sense to not go overboard with them by having hundreds for one chapter.
 
Assassin Ninja Frog
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@Greninjaman

It may help to write out an outline plotting out your story. Once you have your outline, it is not set in stone--you can add to it, delete from it, or change things around as the story demands.
Yeah. That's probably why I give up so fast on my Pokémon Anime Reimagined story
 
hi:)
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i don't like when writers make paul abusive or forceful with romance. it\s a little weird to me.
 
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i don't like when writers make paul abusive or forceful with romance. it\s a little weird to me.
I find Ash x Paul as a ship to be highly questionable......yet it exists. Not as badly as Harry X Draco or Tom Riddle but it exists more than it really should
 
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